Scripting
SCRIPTING BASICS:

First of all, we need to take a look at the basic concepts of SinScript so we can get a feel for the syntax and make better sense of the command descriptions in the command reference. Just use the bottom left navigation frame or follow the links to the 4 sub-sections below if your browser can't handle frames. These are essentially aimed at providing a primer for people who have no previous knowledge of programming. However, if you do have previous programming experience, you may want to proceed straight to the SinScript command reference.

I strongly recommend that you extract script files (.scr) from Ritual's maps (extract those from the pak0.sin file using the makepak utility included with SinEd), make printouts if you can and browse through them. This will allow you to find the actual examples used in the sub-sections and should prove useful in case you want to look for more examples. I also recommend that you make a printout of these docs and use them for future reference. Although every effort was taken to make this information as complete and accurate as possible, I cannot assume any responsibility for innacuracies. I will however correct or update any errors as soon as I find them. If you spot any errors or omissions, by all means, please email me and let me know.


Threads Named Entities Variables Consoles

COMMAND REFERENCE - Syntax Conventions:

In order to make the syntax descriptions as generic as possible in the command reference, a certain number of syntax conventions are used:

  • literal:
    Any text which isn't enclosed in angled brackets is literal, which means that it should be typed "as is" in the command line.

  • <    >:
    Angled brackets. Means a symbolic value. Whatever is enclosed in between angled brackets should be replaced by user defined names or values.

  • italic:
    Italic text denotes an optional command parameter or argument. It can be used but doesn't have to.

  • |:
    Vertical bar. Means exclusive "OR". Used whenever more than one argument can be used in the command but those are mutually exclusive (one or the other can be used separately but not all of them in the same command).

  • [    ]:
    Brackets. Means inclusive "OR". Used whenever more than one argument can be used in the command but those are NOT mutually exclusive (one or the other can be used separately or all of them in the same command).

  • ... :
    3 dots: More. Means that any number of the the preceding argument can be added at the end of the command.

  • blue text:
    Blue text is used for actual command examples.

  • red text :
    Red text is used for important detail notes.